Vive partners with Tate Modern to present VR art experiences

Vive partners with Tate Modern to present VR art experiences
Sean Cleaver

By Sean Cleaver

June 26th 2017 at 12:11PM

New Modigliani exhibition opens in November with an integrated VR experience.

HTC Vive has announced a partnership with the Tate Modern art gallery in London to provide a virtual reality experience for the upcoming Modigliani exhibition.

Starting on November 23rd 2017 until April 2nd 2018, this is the first time the Tate Modern has hosted an exhibition that uses virtual reality technology. It is not, however, the first for HTC as Vive has already enjoyed many collaborations with art, including Somerset House and the Royal Academy of Arts in the UK.

The Modiglani exhibition will look at the Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani who was a painter and sculptor who came to fame after his death in 1920, aged 35. The expressionist artist is known for painting portraits with a distinct style of elongated necks and long faces. He moved to Paris in 1906 and after acquainting himself with popular artists like Pablo Picasso (who was also a portrait subject), moved from the Renaissance training he'd had in his earlier life in Italy.

It's with this part of his life, in Paris, that the exhibition and the VR experience will focus on, exploring the surroundings that helped influence the artist using the immersive technology. "We are delighted to be partnering with Tate Modern on this ground-breaking exhibition," said general manager of HTC Vive, Europe, Paul Brown At the start of the 20th century, Modigliani was a pioneering force in art innovation, pushing boundaries and new possibilities which inspired his peers and contemporaries."

Juan Gris, c1915.

"At Vive, we see something similar at the start of the 21st century with VR, and with Vive we want to revolutionise the way people create and experience art. Our relationship with Tate is another step towards bringing people closer to art than ever before."

"We are thrilled to be working with Vive to bring a new and exciting digital experience to our visitors," added Tate Modern director Frances Morris. "We are always looking to push creative boundaries and we think this will be a fantastic opportunity to give the public a different and in-depth understanding of this much-loved artist through new technology."