Playmob leads season of charitable acts by game makers

Playmob leads season of charitable acts by game makers
Aaron Lee

By Aaron Lee

December 4th 2013 at 12:21PM

Playmob, Wargaming and a collective of indies are doing their part for charity, and encouraging others to get involved

Playmob, the agency that connects developers and publishers with fundraising organisations, has launched a new YouTube channel dedicated to showcasing charitable activities by game companies.

Christened Give8-Bit, the purpose of the channel is to give the games industry a central place to showcase the positive impact it has by creating and playing games. Playmob intends to use the channel as a place for gamers to find out about current and upcoming charitable events in games, and get involved or even give them ideas to run their own gaming fundraiser. The channel will also show record the end result of the activity, allowing gamers to see the direct impact they are having.

Playmob believes games are a powerful source when it comes to creating social change for good. It has calculated that at least $80 million has been raised and donated by the games industry to good causes. Yet so far there has been no single outlet to showcase and promote all of the campaigns while simultaneously informing fellow gamers who would also like to get involved.

“We launched our fundraising platform for the games industry last year and we see the most outstanding efforts to give back in the industry,” said Give8-Bit, Playmob founder and CEO Jude Ower.

“It made sense to have a central place for games, Youtube channels and game streams to hold information about current and upcoming fundraisers. And also spark ideas for how gamers, studios and publishers can give back. As an industry we can harness the powerful force of play to make life changing social impact. Gamers want this and we will provide the quickest and channels for gamers and studios to get involved to raise for the greater good.”

Developers or publishers interested in having their content promoted via Give8-Bit should contact Nick Taylor.

All this comes along side other benevolent initiatives and projects by game companies large and small.

World of Tanks maker Wargaming has partnered with War Child UK to create a virtual campaign to raise awareness of the cruel treatment children face in conflicts around the world today.

‘Real War is Not a Game’ aims to engage the wider games industry in these issues, and Wargaming has already raised a large sum for charity.

Between September 20th and 27th, Wargaming sold three ‘Charity Packages’ on its World of Tanks gift shop. A quarter of the total sales revenue has been donated to War Child UK, which helps children affected by the consequences of conflict. The company presented a cheque to War Child for the total amount raised: €100,000 (£82,875).

“We strongly believe that with success comes also the responsibility to give back and support the community,” said Wargaming in a statement.

“With War Child UK we have found a partner that is exceptional in many ways. War Child is not only actively promoting and helping to create conditions in conflict zones that allow children to be protected from the immediate effects of armoured conflicts, but is doing much more than that. By enabling children to receive an education and assisting families and young adults in acquiring skills that will allow them to make a living from a sustainable income on their own, War Child’s activities make a lasting difference in the life of many.”

Large publishers aren’t alone in taking charitable steps this December.

Glitch City, the Los Angeles-based indie collective and game space, has begun a festive-themed game jam to raise money for the Child’s Play charity.

The Holiday Game Jam began on Friday, November 29th and will take place throughout December, ending on Sunday, 22nd. On Christmas Day, December 25th, all games finished during the jam will be released to raise cash for Child's Play. Games will be sold as a pay-what-you-want.

Donations to the charity can be made through the jam’s official website. And developers interested in taking part can sign up through the event’s Facebook page.