Palmer Luckey announced a new VR studio at the Tokyo Games Show

Palmer Luckey announced a new VR studio at the Tokyo Games Show
Sean Cleaver

By Sean Cleaver

September 25th 2017 at 3:14PM

The Oculus founder took to the HTC Vive stage at the show to tease his new endavour and praise HTC's approach to global markets

Palmer Luckey, the founder of Oculus VR, has announced that he is working on a new project and a new studio. He announced the new on the HTC Vive stage during the Tokyo Games Show last week.

Described as a 'VR Enthusiast' on the HTC live stream Luckey announced that he can't divulge any information or publically name the firm or project he is working on. Introducing himself to the HTC Vive stream, he said "I can't talk about my projects too much yet. But I'm still working in the virtual reality industry on some very exciting things."

Following a quick conversation between the hosts, Luckey then added. "Don't think of me as an Oculus person, just think of me as a VR person, everything. Sony, HTC, other companies – everything."

It's not clear yet what kind of projects Luckey will be working on or working with, but it is unlikely to be anything with his former company. Speaking to the Japanese interviewers, he praised the HTC Vive's technological ability and mentioned that the content shown would likely only be of interest to users in Japan.

"I think it means a lot that HTC are [sic] looking at all markets. Not just Japan, not just China, not just Taiwan, not just US. They really are looking at all the different markets but really spending money to put their money where their mouth is.

"I've always been pretty supportive of all VR companies. Right when Sony announced PSVR, it's the same thing. I was really excited to see other companies enter the marketplace and seriously investing in it, funding developers, funding awareness, getting the hardware out there, I think HTC is doing the same thing."

Palmer has had a bit of tough time lately in the gaming and tech press. In addition to Palmer coming under scrutiny after financing a pro-Trump advertising campaign group during the 2016 US Election, he was also ordered to pay former employer ZeniMax compensation over the breaking of a non-disclosure agreement.