Microsoft Windows chief steps down

Microsoft Windows chief steps down
Aaron Lee

By Aaron Lee

November 13th 2012 at 12:45PM

Tami Reller now overseeing company's OS business

Microsoft’s Windows president Steven Sinofsky has resigned from the company.

Chief financial officer and chief marketing officer Tami Reller will take over the reigns of its Windows business practices. Corporate vice president of program management Julie Larson-Green will lead all Windows software and hardware engineering, having previously been responsible for Windows 7 and 8 user interface design and research.

Both executives will report directly to Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer.

“I am grateful for the many years of work that Steven has contributed to the company,” said Ballmer.

“The products and services we have delivered to the market in the past few months mark the launch of a new era at Microsoft. To continue this success it is imperative that we continue to drive alignment across all Microsoft teams, and have more integrated and rapid development cycles for our offerings.

“It was clear to me that Julie is the best possible person for this job, and I'm excited to have her in this role.”

“After more than 23 years working on a wide range of Microsoft products, I have decided to leave the company to seek new opportunities that build on these experiences. My passion for building products is as strong as ever and I look forward focusing my energy and creativity along similar lines,” wrote Sinofsky in an email sent to employees obtained by CNET.

Sinofsky joined Microsoft in 1989 as a software engineer. During his career, he was in charge of Micrsoft’s Office suite – the company’s biggest profit earner beside Windows. It was his task specifically to persuade the firm’s engineers not to move to Google. He took over the Windows division in 2009, and led the development of Windows 8, which has set the tone for its mobile counterparts.

Sinofsky’s resignation comes just weeks after the launch of Microsoft’s latest operating system, Windows 8, and its new surface tablet, which were both overseen by him.

The former Windows president was tipped to take the position of CEO when Ballmer decided to retire.

However, an anonymous source told Business Insider that Sinofsky's departure was over the position of CEO, with Ballmer indicating that he wouldn't retire until 2017/2018.

Other sources inside the software maker told the Verge that Sinofsky was ejected due to clashes with other executives, despite the split appearing as amicable.