Microsoft exec: I don't get the drama around always-on

Microsoft exec: I don't get the drama around always-on
Craig Chapple

By Craig Chapple

April 5th 2013 at 10:24AM

'I don't get the drama around always-on. That's the world we live in. Deal with it'

The creative director of Microsoft Studios has defended always-connected consoles as fresh reports circulate of a constant internet requirement for the next Xbox.

Taking to Twitter, Adam Orth said he didn’t understand the drama around an always on console, and stated that it’s part of “the world we live in”.

He finished his Tweet with the hashtag “Deal with it”.

“Sorry, I don’t get the drama around an “always on” console,” he said.

“Every device now is “always on”. That’s the world we live in. #Dealwithit.”

When appearing to be questioned by BioWare’s senior gameplay designer Manveer Heir on whether the company had learnt anything from the issues suffered by the likes of Diablo III and SimCity, and that people can lose their internet connection, Orth responded with “Electricity goes out too”.

Heir went on to state that not all places had good connections, to which the Microsoft exec retorted: “Why on earth would I live there?”.

Heir has since said however that he is good friends with Orth, and the two often joke around, telling readers “Don’t read too much into our back & forth”.

“No one in this world is as good as you think they are and no one is really as bad as you think. You see a 2D image of people on the internet," he said.

Orth also apologised for any offence caused to the cities referenced in his retort, and said: "Just the normal daily back and forth I have with Manveer. Apologies for offending non-cities. I was trolling him personally."

As the expected reveal of the next Xbox draws near, reports continue to suggest that Microsoft has opted for always-online functionality for its next-gen console.

It has been claimed that the connection is required to use the new Xbox and play games, even in single player. A previous report also claimed that each disc would come with its own activation code, meaning only the initial user can install and play the game, potentially killing off the second hand market.