Mass Effect 3 'unavailable through Steam'

Mass Effect 3 'unavailable through Steam'
Craig Chapple

By Craig Chapple

January 16th 2012 at 3:04PM

BioWare title 'will require' one-time authorisation through Origin

Mass Effect 3 will not be available through Steam, EA has confirmed.

The publisher revealed that the latest sequel in the blockbuster Sci-Fi franchise would not be on Valve's digital distribution platform due to what it claims are a “set of restrictive terms of service” limiting how developers can interact with customers.

The game will instead require users of both the retail and digital PC versions to download EA's own e-store Origin to access the game.

“During initial release Mass Effect 3 will be available on Origin and a number of other 3rd party digital retailers, but not on Steam at this time,” said BioWare community manager Chris Priestly.

“Steam has adopted a set of restrictive terms of service which limit how developers interact with customers to deliver patches and other downloadable content. 

“We are intent on providing Mass Effect to players with the best possible experience no matter where they purchase or play their game, and are happy to partner with any download service that does not restrict our ability to connect directly with our consumers.”

Priestly added that a one-time authorisation will be required through Origin, but there would be no limit to the number of installs, and that single player will not require a constant internet connection.

EA’s unsurprising shun of Steam comes after a long running feud with Valve over DLC sales policies and the rivalry with the publishing giant’s own digital e-store, Origin.

The dispute arose early last year after EA attempted to directly sell add-ons to its games sold through Steam.

Due to those actions being interpreted as a violation of Steam’s terms and conditions, Valve removed the offending games from its Steam Store.

Back in August EA’s Europe boss Jen Uwe Intat stated the company’s relationship with the Half-Life developer was not beyond repair, and also “didn’t see” that the publisher would only distribute its own games on its own platform.

This latest move however seems to show there is still a long way to go for the two companies to resolve their dispute.