Does David Cameron really love video games?

Does David Cameron really love video games?

By Rob Crossley

September 22nd 2010 at 10:42AM

Prime Minister â??adoresâ?? iPhone title Angry Birds, but does he love the industry behind it?

The man perched at the top of the UK political system is said to have fallen in love with the iPhone game Angry Birds.

Andy Payne, the chairman of trade association UKIE, was encouraged to see Prime Minister David Cameron personally embrace videogames – following a two-year campaign from the games industry to receive better state support.

“The Prime Minister is a huge Angry Birds fan and has paid for the full game. Times are a changin',” Payne stated via Twitter.

“He absolutely loves it. Wants to know what other top games he should get for his iPad. Compiling a list for him.”

The news comes after Deputy Prime minister Nick Clegg took the photo opportunity to play a Wii game at the Liberal Democrat Party Conference.

Meanwhile the culture secretary Jeremy Hunt “is looking forward to the London Games Festival and believes in our industry”, according to Payne.

The publicity may offer some hope that Whitehall is still keen to embrace the UK games industry – having abandoned it during the Emergency Budget by scrapping approved plans for tax breaks.

Cameron himself was questioned in the Commons over the Government’s decision to scrap game tax breaks, to which he responded with the Treasury’s line on the matter:

“We believe that what matters is having low tax rates, and what we did in the Budget – which the House voted on last night – was to cut the small company rate of corporation tax back down to 20p from 22p and set out a path for getting corporation tax down to 24% by the end of this Parliament,” he said.

In 2007 the Tory leader said:

"We are never going to deal with crime unless we look at the broader context and say - Yes, tough laws, strong action on the police, but also action to strengthen our society.

"And that includes, I think, video games and things like that where we do need to think of the context in which people are growing up."